Category Archives: Industry News

10 Ethical Blog Rules (to avoid a beatdown…)

Black-Eyed P...Hilton

Black-Eyed P...Hilton

Perez Hilton wasn’t hidden behind his blog in an office when he told Will.i.am of The Black Eyed Peas that “he was a faggot.” And that caused the frumpy blog diva some problems.

Perez has come under criticism for berating Hollywood stars and starlets. He has also been called into question regarding his tactics of “outing” suspected homosexuals on his blog, perezhilton.com: the overall consensus is that it’s a person’s personal business, and not Perez’s.

Whether Will.i.am is gay, or not, is, quite frankly, moot. After having some words, the night progressed with arguments taking place in different locations. In the end, it came to a head. There are differing sides to the story along with some rapid tweeting by Hilton asking for his fans to save him. He reportedly had already called the police.

Although violence doesn’t ever help, it  almost understandable in this case: Perez Hilton taunts celebritities by drawing pictures of penises on their faces, calling women “sluts” and “whores,” and making wild statements like wanting to lick David Beckham in his underwear.

Does Perez deserve to be attacked for what he wrote? As we’ve seen in the past, the stars in Hollywood have varying past experiences, some violent. A couple times a year, some Hollywood personality, or bodyguard, is arrested on weapons charges.

Lucky that Perez wasn’t shot.

Hilton is old enough to know better, yet brazen enough to have built a seven-figure income on his catty innuendos. While much of what he writes does turn out to be the truth, is it responsible journalism? As “We, The People” become source and distributor of news, there is a moral and ethical responsiblity to which we should adhere. Unfortunately, it’s not been instituted as of yet. The basics are simple, though:

  1. If you are reporting  first-time news, call for emergency services prior to writing (if necessary)
  2. Provide help when and where necessary
  3. Do not block emergency personnel
  4. Write as many facts down as fast as possible
  5. Write what you see, not what you think
  6. Blogging allows for opinion, but not in place of facts
  7. If what you write  could endanger someone, rethink and rewrite
  8. Write as if you are writing about a loved one:
    1. Be Honest
    2. Be Fair
    3. Be Accountable
  9. The news is the news. Distortion or Plagiarism is lying
  10. Despite what you think, what you write CAN hurt you

Although I cannot swear to it, the site seems a bit “tamer” since Perez & the Peas got into it. More of a pat on the back than a smack in the face. One of his favorite people to rip into is Lindsay Lohan. However, the site is giving her strokes, not slaps, in a post today. Honestly, she looks like crap…

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Filed under Industry News, Morality, Morals, State of The Industry, State of the Nation, Truth

Brand Yourself Before the Lay-Off

Let me tell you that it’s humbling and life-altering; one day a contributor, the next, not so much. In between panhandling, emailing resumes that no one sees, calling people that can’t help you, and begging those that won’t, there is some time to actually think. What could I have done better, how should I have positioned myself, and why did’t I take that job last year at that other agency?
I’ve also started reading more. Occasionally, a book will come along and floor me with it’s brilliance, shake me out of my stupor. Like icy water. Well, guess what? That book hasn’t come yet.
However, I did read a fantastic article on how to brand yourself so as to not get let go (too late, obviously).
The article is short; the writer part of my LinkedIn “circle.” From brief “run-ins” with him via email or in seedy chatrooms, he seems to walk the walk. His name is Dan Scwabel, and you can follow him on LinkedIn, Twitter, VisualCV and JobFox (I am actually proud of myself—I am on all four, although only two are complete.)
Here are Dan’s Top Ten Suggestions:
<blockquote>1. Become an invaluable asset to your colleagues, professional network & clients
2. Position yourself as the go-to-person for a specific skill
3. Gain self-confidence and rise to the occasion
4. Focus on social equity, not just monetary equity
5. Build contact lists before you need them
6. Go on a branding spree by advertising it everywhere
7. Make your brand so visible that people can’t avoid seeing you
8. Become so remarkable that complete strangers talk about you my favorite
9. Be a content producer, not just a consumer
10. Have an “endorsement mindset”
Last but not least, and possibly one of the most important things to keep in mind, is the power of positive endorsements. Collect endorsements throughout your life like you would collect baseball cards. You are the chief marketing officer for the brand called you, but what others say about your brand is more impactful than what you say about yourself. </blockquote>
Now I am going to pester him every week…
<strong>Jeff Louis</strong> is a Strategic Media Planner, Project Manager, and New Business Coordinator. His passion is writing, contributing to BMA as well as freelancing. He’d love to hear from you: linkedin.com/in/jefflouis or twitter.com/jlo0312.

WhereAmIGoing

I’ve beome part of a great movement, a swelling tide of humanity that suddenly, and without warning,  find they arejobless, struggling to survive.

This is not a complaint, and I am not going to bitch; rather, I’m explaining an “awakening.” Several, actually. One realization I’ve come to is that it’s not likely that I’ll work in my chosen profession again (Advertising). At least not in my area of knowledge, which is media planning.

It’s humbling, life-altering and depressing; one day a contributor, the next, locked out of a job, responsibilities, and a sense of being. In between networking, emailing resumes to nameless people that don’t ever return phone calls or emails, calling people that want to help but can’t, and trying to make a break any way possible, there are times when the brain meanders on to subjects of what did go wrong.

The second realization is this; People that are vital to a company don’t seem to get laid off. Period. Deep in my heart, I feel somehow that there’s a kernel of truth in this, and although I asked for reasons and answers before being ushered out the door…to the point of their exasperation…I was never going to find out if there was a reason behind it all.

Unknowing, I move on.

personal-branding1-300x225

“How could I have positioned myself better?” is one question that runs through my head, closely followed by a second, “Why didn’t I take another job?” I knew in my bones that my previous job was not the place for me, and had spoken at length about that very subject with my fiancée. I  had been interviewing for over a year, though sporadically, but I had a couple offers. Yet, I wasn’t committed, and never followed through…mainly out of loyalty to a company that did not deserve it. And that, too, is the sad truth.

(If you know that you’re in the wrong place, take the leap of faith.)

So, I am learning to listen more. And I write more. I’ve done some freelancing, which pays well. I read a lot, and have learned more than any job could teach, taking advantage of every work-related seminar or webinar that’s offered. I’ve been gaining certifications as well as insight. I’ve also realized that there others out of work who are much more qualified, smarter, and more personable.

In a negative light, I’ve begun to second-guess myself, my capabilities, and my life. It’s always darkest before the dawn.

(In a weird sense, I am happier now than I was working for my former bossess. Not the underlings, the big dogs.)

A couple weeks ago, I read a fantastic article on self-branding. It was a guide on  “How to Not Get Let Go” …obviously a bit late in my case, but hopefully you’ll benefit from it.

The article is short; the author is Dan Scwabel, and you can follow him on LinkedIn, Twitter, VisualCV, and JobFox, among others. Without reproducing his entire work, here is the meat of the article:

1. Become an invaluable asset to colleagues,  networks & clients

2. Position yourself as the go-to-person for a specific skill

3. Gain self-confidence and rise to the occasion

4. Focus on social equity, not just monetary equity

5. Build contact lists before you need them

6. Go on a branding spree by advertising it everywhere

7. Make your brand so visible that people can’t avoid seeing you

8. Become so remarkable that strangers talk about you

9. Be a content producer, not just a consumer

10. Have an “endorsement mindset”

Last but not least, and possibly one of the most important things to keep in mind, is the power of positive endorsements. Collect endorsements throughout your life like you would collect baseball cards. You are the chief marketing officer for the brand called you, but what others say about your brand is more impactful than what you say about yourself.

It’s simple and straight-forward. Succinct, yet speaks volumes. Read it. Tape it to your computer. Carry it in your purse. Lap it up, soak it in, and use it. It may save your job.

Thanks for reading. If you’d like to comment or ask a question, please do so here or on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Jeff Louis is an advertising professional whose background covers Strategic Media Planning, Brand Building, and New Business Account Coordination. His passion is writing, contributing to Beyond Madison Avenue and Digital Pivot, as well as other freelance assignments as a media planner and writer.

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Filed under advertising, Branding, Industry News, Truth

Creative Times = Creative Measures

posters

If you’re anything like me, “change” is a word that has been overused of late. Well, unfortunately, it’s going to happen again: Change. Change. CHANGE!

Change the way you think. Change the way you act. Look at your client from another angle. Ask someone else what they see. Don’t rely on what you think you know, go and find out what others know.

Our industry beat the phrase, “Think Outside the Box” into the ground, but now-really-it’s time to think outside the box. If you wait for your clients to come to you, it’s too late…trust me, others have great ideas, just like you do. The only difference is that they’re acting on theirs. So, Refresh. Renew. Revitalize. Do something…something is always better than nothing.

Try Guerrilla! It’s relatively inexpensive. You can target geographically. It’s tactical. It makes a splash. It may get you in trouble, but it gets the message out…and PR is PR, right?

Granted, it won’t be perfect for every client, but you have at least one that would benefit. Automotive? Entertainment? Packaged Goods? Think it’s not for your clients? Think again: MSN, Yahoo, Carmex, Disney, Activision, CBS, TBS, New Balance, Absolut, AT&T, New York Sports Clubs, Pepsi, and tons of new movie releases have all recently used some form of poster advertising.

You’re there because you’re creative. So, be creative.

Jeff Louis: Has been a Strategic Media Planner, Project Manager, and New Business Coordinator in the advertising profession. His passion is writing, contributing to a couple different blogs as well as writing for hire. To get in touch, leave a comment or contact him via: linkedin.com or twitter.com.

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Filed under advertising, Creativity, Industry News, Out of Home, State of The Industry